Anne Rice leaves Christianity after ‘a kind of confusion, a toxic anger’

Aug. 09, 2010 | 12:22 p.m.

Los Angeles Times staff writer Mitchell Landsberg had an interview with the vampire writer — namely Anne Rice, who has stirred up a great deal of debate and emotion with her recent public expressions regarding faith and religion. Here’s an excerpt from the article that ran this weekend…

Anne Rice

The author Anne Rice, best known for her vampire novels, made waves last week when she declared on her Facebook page that she had “quit being a Christian.” Twelve years after her return to Catholicism, Rice said she still believed in God, but that, “In the name of Christ, I refuse to be anti-gay. I refuse to be anti-feminist. I refuse to be anti-artificial birth control. I refuse to be anti-Democrat. I refuse to be anti-secular humanism. I refuse to be anti-science. I refuse to be anti-life.”

Rice spoke to The Times by phone this week from her home in Rancho Mirage.

Q) You were raised Catholic, became an atheist, then returned to Catholicism in 1998. Why are you quitting now? It’s not as if the church has suddenly changed.

A) Well, I’ve been living with this now for 12 years, and I’ve come to the conclusion from my experience with organized religion that I have to leave, that I have to, in the name of Christ, step away from this. It’s a matter of rejecting what I’ve discovered about the persecution of gays, the persecution and oppression of women and the actions of the churches on many different levels. I’ve also found that I can’t find a basis in Scripture for a lot of the positions that churches and denominations take today, and I can’t find any basis at all for an anointed, hierarchical priesthood. So all of this finally created a pressure in me, a kind of confusion, a toxic anger at times, and I felt I had to step aside. And that’s what I’ve done…

Anne Rice

Q) Two days before you announced on your Facebook page that you were quitting Christianity, you praised the Lutheran Church for welcoming gay pastors. So why not become a Lutheran, or a member of some other church that shares your views?

A) I feel much more morally comfortable walking away from organized religion. I respect that there are all kinds of denominations and all kinds of churches, but it’s the entire controversy, the entire conversation that I need to walk away from right now.

Q) The United Church of Christ even started a Facebook campaign to get you to join. How can you say no to that?

A) I respect completely people who want to find a church that’s more in accord with what they can morally accept. But for me, walking away is the thing right now. In the name of Christ, in the name of God.

Anne Rice

Q) I wanted to ask you about that, because you have said that you quit Christianity “in the name of Christ.” From a practical standpoint, what does that mean, how do you follow Christ without a church? Are there rituals that you intend to maintain?

A) I think the basic ritual is simply prayer. It’s talking to God, putting things in the hands of God, trusting that you’re living in God’s world and praying for God’s guidance. And being absolutely faithful to the core principles of Jesus’ teachings.

Q) You’ve said that there are rituals of the Catholic Church that you’ll miss.

A) Well, I will. I’ll very much miss going to Mass, and I’ll very much miss Holy Communion, the Eucharist. But it’s a communal meal…and I don’t feel that I’m part of the community anymore, and I don’t feel that I can go to a Catholic church and partake.

Q) You’ve written before about your love of churches, even during the time you were an atheist. Do you see yourself going back in a church?

A) Oh yeah, I would certainly go to a church to pray in private…

THERE’S MORE, READ THE REST

– Mitchell Landsberg

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Photo: Anne Rice at home in La Jolla, Calif., with some of her Christian icons in December 2005. Credit: Los Angeles Times

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