‘Birds of Prey’ 25: Black Canary defends her dojo in Zero Year

Nov. 19, 2013 | 6:00 a.m.

The cover for "Birds of Prey" No. 25. (Jorge Molina / DC Entertainment)

Page 1 of "Birds of Prey" No. 25, written by Christy Marx with art by Romano Molenaar and Jonathan Glapion. (DC Entertainment)

Page 2 of "Birds of Prey" No. 25, written by Christy Marx with art by Romano Molenaar and Jonathan Glapion. (DC Entertainment)

Page 3 of "Birds of Prey" No. 25, written by Christy Marx with art by Romano Molenaar and Jonathan Glapion. (DC Entertainment)

Page 4 of "Birds of Prey" No. 25, written by Christy Marx with art by Romano Molenaar and Jonathan Glapion. (DC Entertainment)

Page 5 of "Birds of Prey" No. 25, written by Christy Marx with art by Romano Molenaar and Jonathan Glapion. (DC Entertainment)

“Birds of Prey” fans know Dinah Lance as Black Canary, that superheroine team’s confident, sonic-blasting leader.

The last two issues have seen her shocked to learn that her husband, Kurt Lance, whom she long thought she’d killed with her “canary cry,” is alive — but those present-day revelations are on hold this month.

In “Birds of Prey” No. 25, out Wednesday, readers see her before she was Black Canary, back six years ago when she was Dinah Drake — and less sure of herself. The petite but powerful heroine is sensei of a dojo in Gotham City, which has a superstorm bearing down on it as the Riddler plunges it into darkness. Dinah’s sensei, who kept the local gangs at bay, has died, leaving her in charge. The toughs think they can bully protection payments out of her. They should have thought twice.

Hero Complex readers get an exclusive preview of the issue’s first five pages, seen in the gallery above and in larger version in the links below.

“Birds of Prey” No. 25: Cover | Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Page 5

The story from the regular series team of writer Christy Marx and artist Romano Molenaar (joined in pencil work here by Daniel Sampere and Travis Moore) is a tie-in to “Zero Year,” the hit Batman origin story for DC Comics’ New 52 reality.

The 11-part event in Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo’s “Batman” is felt in a number of additional titles this month. Also looking six years into their characters’ pasts, just before the dawn of the superhero age, are Bat-family series including “Detective Comics,” “Batgirl,” “Nightwing,” “Catwoman” and “Red Hood and the Outlaws,” as well as “The Flash,” “Green Lantern Corps,” “Green Arrow” and “Action Comics.”

– Blake Hennon | @BlakeHennon | @LATHeroComplex

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