Games


Sept. 06, 2014 | 5:00 a.m.

Gamergate-related controversy reveals ugly side of gaming community

Noted pop culture critic Anita Sarkeesian has been the target of online harassment. Above, a screengrab of one of her video critiques of the game industry on site Feminist Frequency. (http://www.feministfrequency.com/)
THE PLAYER This column is usually dedicated to discussing video games, but in the past week and a half, you’d be forgiven for not having the stomach to play one. I haven’t. Infighting, finger-pointing and the airing of dirty laundry have dominated the late summer in video games. For those who have played an online multiplayer game, this may sound like any other day in video games. But it’s not. Now the attacks are so threatening in nature that even the FBI has taken notice. A long-simmering schism among select, very vocal members of the gaming community and others in the industry has come to the fore over the last two weeks, resulting in unprecedented levels of death threats and harassment directed at game designers and writers — many of them women. This is not, to be clear, some trash-talking […]
Aug. 30, 2014 | 7:00 a.m.

’80 Days': Jules Verne-inspired game brings a more global perspective

Travel by land, by sea and even mechanical horse in mobile adventure "80 Days/" (Inkle)
THE PLAYER Back in grade school, I proposed doing a book report on “Gold Rush!” — a computer game first released in the late ’80s. My teacher thought I was trying to pull a fast one. Yet the truth of the matter is “Gold Rush!” contained more text and actual history than the heavily illustrated dinosaur book I chose instead. But the dinosaur sketches were encased in binding. “Gold Rush!” had disks. There was a day when the most popular games were essentially interactive novels — point, click, read and type. That day was killed by the first-person shooter, which ushered in an era during which the most dominant of games were competitive and reflex-based. But there’s good news for those who believe a written sentence is more powerful than digital bullets or the ability for players to hijack a […]
Aug. 23, 2014 | 6:00 a.m.

‘Hohokum': All the braver for ignoring gaming conventions

The emphasis is on exploration in "Hohokum." (Honeyslug / Sony Santa Monica)
THE PLAYER Deep within dating site OkCupid, there’s a question that treats video games as child’s play. “Would you be willing to date someone who plays video games almost every day, for at least 2 hours?” Two hours may seem excessive for our time-crunched lives, but there’s an underlying implication that the above activity is perhaps a bit weird — a potential red flag about anyone otherwise considered a full-fledged adult. Although the video game industry doesn’t do itself any favors, what with tolerating the boorish behavior of its online communities and relying on games that emphasize gun play, there’s no denying that this is a mainstream medium that still carries a stigma. But the OkCupid question did hit a chord. There are times when even I feel embarrassed about my accruing games knowledge. It’s the moment, for instance, when […]
Aug. 16, 2014 | 6:00 a.m.

‘Road Not Taken': Ranger’s life is hard, but you’ll connect on journey

Rescue lost children by throwing and combining items in "Road Not Taken." (Spry Fox)
THE PLAYER “You’re not too old for those?” she asked. The question came from a date who arched her head and squinted at an assortment of Batman-branded pillowcases in my bedroom. Those six words hovered on the forefront of my mind, forcing me to suddenly call into question every aspect of my life and how it reflected my level of maturity (or immaturity). Adulthood, and how it weighs on us, has been an obsession of late. It’s at the core of Spry Fox’s “Road Not Taken,” a vexing puzzle game with magical overtones released this month for home computers and the PlayStation 4.The questions it raises linger long after a play session. The game has a message: You’re not getting any younger. Or maybe it’s saying you’re running out of time. This is the emotional head space occupied by “Road […]
Aug. 14, 2014 | 12:03 p.m.

‘Spiderwick’ creator Tony DiTerlizzi returns to RPG days for ‘Realms’

Card illustration from Magic: The Gathering game by Tony DiTerlizzi. (Tony DiTerlizzi)
Children’s book author and artist Tony DiTerlizzi hit the jackpot with his first paid job out of art school: He got a one-way ticket to the world of Dungeons & Dragons. Though his career has taken him to places far beyond the worlds of role-playing games, DiTerlizzi’s heart has remained with those monsters and heroes. And now he’s returning again for “Realms: The Roleplaying Game Art of Tony DiTerlizzi,” a hardcover collection of his early work from Dark Horse Comics and Kitchen Sink Books coming in June 2015. Years before DiTerlizzi was known as the co-creator of “The Spiderwick Chronicles” or the “WondLa” books, he was an artist fresh out of the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale who loved playing Dungeons & Dragons and needed a gig. On a lark, he sent a portfolio of monster drawings to TSR, the […]
Aug. 12, 2014 | 4:59 p.m.

Guillermo del Toro, Hideo Kojima team up for new ‘Silent Hill’ game

Silent Hills
Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro and “Metal Gear Solid” creator Hideo Kojima will join forces for a return trip to Silent Hill. Word about the new installment in the long-running video game series arrived Tuesday via an interactive teaser released on the PlayStation store. Near the conclusion of an hour-plus long demo for a game referred to as “P.T.,” title cards appeared on screen featuring both Del Toro’s name and Kojima’s (another suggested the game could be titled “Silent Hills”). Also glimpsed was a character modeled on “The Walking Dead” star Norman Reedus, who could be seen standing on a desolate city street at night. Although some years away from its creative zenith, the “Silent Hill” franchise won a legion of fans for its atmospheric thrills and surreal imagery. It spawned two films — 2006’s “Silent Hill,”and more recently, 2012’s “Silent […]
Aug. 09, 2014 | 6:00 a.m.

‘Revolution 60′: Sci-fi mobile game puts women at the front

"Revolution 60" is a mobile game with cinematic aspirations. (Giant Spacekat)
THE PLAYER Early in the sci-fi mobile game “Revolution 60,” one character is essentially rendered brain-dead. Our heroine, Holiday, frets over what she’ll tell the fiancé of her immobilized pal. Maybe, one of the other space-flying shipmates wisecracks, the boy back home isn’t so hot on personality. Doubtful, as being reduced to mere eye candy would likely be seen as a fate worse than death for the four women at the core of “Revolution 60” — and for the two women who founded the company that created the game. Giant Spacekat’s “Revolution 60,” released in late July for iPhones and iPads, is a pocket-sized game that dreams big, ambitiously attempting to marry a complex narrative and fully drawn characters with pick-up-and-play accessibility. That’s not its only mission. Developed by a Boston-based team of four led by Giant Spacekat’s head of […]
Aug. 06, 2014 | 12:00 p.m.

‘Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor’ creators mine Tolkien lore for game

The Wraith, Celebrimbor, Talion in "Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor." (Warner Bros. Interactive)
Last month, filmmaker and J.R.R. Tolkien ambassador Peter Jackson made his final appearance at San Diego’s Comic-Con International to promote one of his feature film adaptations of the literary master’s work. But December’s “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” wasn’t the only project inspired by the imagined geography of Tolkien’s universe to make news at the pop culture expo. During the “Middle-earth: Shadow of Mordor” panel, it was revealed that the Wraith, a character in the newest “Lord of the Rings” franchise video game, was actually Celebrimbor, the greatest Elven smith of the Second Age. He was deceived by Sauron into working with him to forge the Rings of Power, then murdered along with his family. His spirit was residing in Mordor, awaiting vengeance against the Dark Lord, when Talion, who was also murdered at the hands of […]
Aug. 02, 2014 | 7:00 a.m.

‘Kim Kardashian Hollywood’: Fame is the name of the game

"Kim Kardashian: Hollywood" is surprisingly progressive for a video game. (Glu Mobile)
THE PLAYER Whether we like it or not, when it comes to Kim Kardashian, we’re all, in a sense, amateur Kardiologists. We know about the reality show, the sex tape, the quickie marriage to an NBA star, Kanye West and the Kimya wedding. We’re told she’s a fashion designer, model, actress, socialite and blogger. We see she’s a wearer of bikinis. Still, why Kim Kardashian is famous is a mystery. “I do not know what she does,” Stephen Colbert joked on his Comedy Central show this week, echoing the thoughts of many of us. When someone’s primary expertise is omnipresence, the more we know, the less we actually learn. But we’re getting more insight from Kim’s latest and more unlikely role as a rather convincing video game character. “Kim Kardashian: Hollywood,” a free-to-play mobile game by the reality star, is […]
July 27, 2014 | 10:29 p.m.

Comic-Con 2014: ‘Lego Batman 3′ will take players back to ’60s Batman

The “Lego Batman” games have always put a lighter spin on a character that’s traditionally as grim and gritty as they come, but the upcoming third game in the series, “Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham” will add a bit of retro fun. Holy nostalgia, Batman! Players of the game, which will be available later this year for all systems, will get to play a level of the 1960s “Batman” series, with Adam West himself providing the voice of Batman. Additionally, gamers will also be able to play as the entire ’60s cast, including Robin, the Boy Wonder. They’re just a few of the 150 playable characters in the new game. And in case you’re wondering, yes, Lego Batman will dance the Batusi. Other playable characters include familiar faces from the Justice League and the Legion of Doom. “Lego Batman 3″ […]
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