‘Tron: Uprising’: An early look at Disney’s return to the Grid

Feb. 20, 2012 | 11:28 a.m.
127522 0001 ‘Tron: Uprising’: An early look at Disneys return to the Grid

The Light Crawler is one of the new vehicles designed for "Tron: Uprising." (Disney XD)

The Grid, a world of shimmering, digital wonder, was introduced to moviegoers in 1982 film “Tron” and then taken to a new visual level in “Tron: Legacy” in 2010. Now the Grid is going to television and expanding with a wider mythology and new characters — and more of the sleek, glowing vehicles that fans love.

“Tron: Uprising,” which begins this summer on Disney XD, was developed by Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis, the same tandem that wrote “Tron: Legacy,” and they say the freedom of animation is allowing to explore the Grid without the constraints of a special effects budget.

“The fun thing about animation is all the stuff we couldn’t afford in [‘Tron: Legacy’], either because they were financially or technologically prohibitive, we can now do because it’s animated,” Kitsis said.

The duo, now also working on its freshman ABC show “Once Upon a Time,” has picked up the Grid’s story right after Clu takes over, which happened years before the events of “Legacy.” The new show isn’t about users — those are humans who go into Grid, such as Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges) or  Sam Flynn (Garrett Hedlund)  in the films — but focuses instead on programs, the citizens of the Grid. The main character is Beck (voiced by Elijah Wood), the unlikely leader of a revolution against Clu.

As Kitsis puts it: “What happens when you find yourself occupied by a force that is not in your best interest – how do you fight back?”

As for the new vehicles, “Tron: Legacy” designer Daniel Simon is back on the job with creations such as the Light Crawler — which you can see in the exclusive early-look image above – and a Light Rail, which Kitsis calls “basically the coolest train you’ve ever seen — it goes upside down.”

tron premiere21 ‘Tron: Uprising’: An early look at Disneys return to the Grid

Edward Kitsis (left) and Adam Horowitz at the premiere of "Tron: Legacy." (John Sciulli / Getty Images)

In one episode, a fight takes place on the roof of the Light Rail, just one moment that evokes the western spirit that exists beneath the show’s high-tech trappings. The Grid, Horowitz explained, is “essentially a frontier town.”

Mandy Moore and Bruce Boxleitner (reprising his title role from the two movies) join Wood in the cast, while  Charlie Bean (“Ren & Stimpy,” “Samurai Jack”) is the show’s director-showrunner. “Tron: Uprising” also features the music of Daft Punk.

– Emily Rome

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Comments


47 Responses to ‘Tron: Uprising’: An early look at Disney’s return to the Grid

  1. Shaka says:

    TRON: Legacy had a lot going for it. Unfortunately, the writing was not one of those things.

    • Kelsley says:

      You're crazy! and another TRON will be made, that's how good the writing was.

      • Ben says:

        Agreed… I found the writing in Legacy to be quite strong, and am optimistic that we will see a third TRON film.

      • Joe says:

        No, the writing wasn't great, but the effects more than made up for it. I enjoyed it and my daughter takes some sneak peeks at the movie on my phone. The only bad thing I see about the show is its a bit dark. Transformers Prime, Star Wars Clone Wars are all dark whn you see them on the TV (yes, i've seent hem on several types and they are all the same).

        But i'm sure my kids will enjoy this, even if it might be a bit over their heads.

    • vincent says:

      Legacy had a great many things going for it the story line was good acting as well however I found that it wasnt quite as action pact as the original one it had action in it.. but just not as much.

    • Aoi says:

      If you look deeper, TRON:Legacy has a complex storyline.

  2. Steve Kidd says:

    That video's been around since July. IT'S NOT NEW.

  3. @BetterKevin says:

    These guys are good at TV shows so I'm sure it'll be more palpable than the writing of legacy

  4. Ira Owens says:

    Yeah I love that writers always say that it was the budget that got in the way…not the writing?

  5. Troff says:

    The writing was not, in any way, good. Nor, already from the sounds of it, will be the series.

    Even if you ignore the fact that Legacy pretty much spits all over the original (not to mention, not even a single nod to "TRON 2.0"), Legacy contradicted the associated materials "Betrayal" and "Evolution" – the other, star-appearing, Disney-backed stuff. how do you reconcile TRON's end in Betrayal with Legacy? How do you reconcile Quorra and Flynn's complete failure to mention the start of Evolution?

    Just looking at Legacy in isolation, the writing was poor. Why didn't Sam have any of Kevin Flynn's powers (even the powers of young Kevin)? How were Sam and Quorra able to escape the Grid when CLU and Rinzler couldn't go "off-road", but had flying LightJets?

    … and for that matter, would it have killed Kitsis and Horowitz to interview a couple of programmers to see how insane the idea of a spontaneously-generated program is? We live in a world where the Internet is everywhere; being ignorant of these things is like not being able to read a few hundred years after Gutenberg died. In a REAL world with gigabit Ethernet, different operating systems, Wi-Fi, RFID, Quantum computing basics, Beowulf clusters and VIRTUAL COMPUTERS… did K&H think they'd run out of source material before pulling this out of their asses?

    Legacy ignored what made TRON so special – it was a DIFFERENT WORLD where special laws of physics, utterly under the control of Humans are what apply.

    The Grid can't be a "frontier town" – remember, it's a COMPUTER. If it's a lawless place and programs are being destroyed everywhere (and there's no User to be writing or running new ones), then the computer is going to crash. Think how frustrated you get when Word or Excel crashes on you. Think what happens when (even a UNIX-like Solaris-knockoff) computer runs for 20 years, with programs crashing every minute. How long is the computer going to stay up?

    The fact that the "new designed vehicles" are such a big focus is a double-bad thing: bad because it means that characterisation and good writing are being sacrificed for flashy neon/latex designs (which, unlike original or TRON 2.0, aren't at all suggestive of Programs). Even worse, because we never got to see any of these new flashy vehicles in the now-later-set Legacy, or Evolution, or Betrayal.

    Time to re-install TRON 2.0 and install some of the fan content packs like Killer App, or start subscribing to TRON fanfic sites or even (this is the Open Source era) writing your own… because Kitsis, Horowitz and today's Disney don't understand what they have in TRON at all. As expensive and rigidly controlled as Apple; as blundering and bureaucratic as Microsoft; as over-reaching and community-hurtful as Oracle. Maybe, like IBM, they could start to re-invent themselves.

    If they could see the need. But they won't. It's all about the shekel, not about the product. Ironic, given what (thanks to Bonnie MacBird, more than Steven Lisberger) the original TRON movie had to say about people toiling away like slaves in cubicles… but their spirit lived on in every single work they created.

    • Mr. Baby Puncher says:

      Tell us how you really feel. please?

      • Troff says:

        Certainly. Would you like me to start with the Republican progress? :-)

        I kid. I'm not even a U.S. citizen. But it is fascinating watching all this go on from across the Pacific Ocean.

    • EndOfLine says:

      I totally agree with you on this.

      One of the major failings for me is that for a movie called Tron, the title character is pretty much non-existant in the story line. In the original, the story revolved around both Kevin Flynn and Tron. Tron was just as important to the story as Flynn. This time around he plays almost no part in the events of the movie aside from being the voiceless, faceless peon of CLU. Sure he regains his identity at the end but his sacrifice was pretty much in vain since he didn't actually stop or hinder CLU at all. Thus, Tron has no purpose in the story. Its quite a shame that his sacrifice ends up being nothing more than an inconvenience to the main villain rather then something worthy of his character.

      There were a lot of neat things that they could have done with the ideas they had. I liked the idea of Tron being reprogramed by CLU to be a bad guy, it's just that he just should have been more integral to the events of the story. The fact that we don't see his face at all disconnects us from the fact that Rinzler is Tron. In fact they should have just forgone the whole Rinzler thing and just had him be Tron and he's just under CLU's control. Sure have his face be obscured at first, but then reveal who it is at the end of the disk battle between him and Sam. This would be quite a shock for Sam who was just recently talking to Alan in the real world. This would add a lot of tension and drama to the story. And we as the audience would be more emotionally invested in Tron's role. Not to mention it would give Bruce Boxleitner more face time.

      You also make a good point about this being a computer controlled world and having a random species of cyber-people appear out of nowhere is not logical. A computer cannot go beyond what its programmed to do. Period. It can't upgrade itself. Someone on the outside world would have to upgrade the hardware and software that keeps the Grind running. So having all this new-fangled stuff makes no sense because no one has been in that room for twenty-something years to upgrade it.

      So yeah, the writing is pretty crap.

      • Troff says:

        Your additional points are quite right. Well, except for one part…

        > The fact that we don't see his face at all disconnects us from the fact that Rinzler is Tron.

        Except he's the only Program we see with a similar symbol on his chest. I attended the cinematic preview clip. When asked by the Disney representative I pointed out that it was really obvious.

    • Hamelic says:

      You sir, are obviously a SUPER NERD! I mean, honestly, it's a freaking movie. It's not supposed to be realistically detailed to the last second. Give it a break man! and about how different this movie was from the first graphic-wise…. well obviously they didn't have the technology back then to pull off such graphics, otherwise, I can almost assure you that there wouldn't have been such a drastic difference.

      • Troff says:

        > You sir, are obviously a SUPER NERD!
        I prefer the term "geek". But whatever floats your boat.

        > I mean, honestly, it's a freaking movie. It's not supposed to be realistically detailed to the last second.
        I do believe we've covered that already.

        > Give it a break man!
        No, absolutely not. To do so is to give Hollywood and Disney a free ride. Disney's current stock price is $41.31. Their current market cap is 74 billion dollars. Why isn't it time they started earning their damn money? Why do I have to put up with your low standards?

        > and about how different this movie was from the first graphic-wise
        How about, how similar it is to the graphics of every other contemporary movie? How about the bagging it got for sitting young Kevin Flynn right in the middle of the Uncanny Valley? How about the fact that, unlike the original TRON, it failed to do anything innovative?

    • Doctor Wattson says:

      According to the Tron story line Tron 2.0 is just like the ton of fan fiction people make for a popular series. Betrayal is somewhat explained in Legacy as when he talks about what Clu did. Evolution is just a little more of Betrayal and just explain more of what caused the events in Legacy. They don't actually need to explain it to Flynn since they don't involve the current situation. Taking the time to explain the events to him would just be a waste of valuable time.

      Also, if normal rules don't apply to The Grid then why are spontaneously-generated programs so bad? If normal rules don't apply so these things could probably happen.
      Flynn may not have the same powers of his dad in The Grid since he is new there so doesn't understand everything, maybe if he spent enough time there he would be able to do the things his dad does.

      The new vehicles are just part of what happens when you try and make a prequel. You have to maintain some sense of it being new and flashy but staying within the limits of what is already out there. This vehicles could have been put out of commission for some reason that we might see in the show.

      The Grid can be a "frontier town" since only the strong survive there and that's how the frontier was. Since a User is in hiding the computer cannot crash. The computer could also just make new programs after things have been de-rezz. The code could just combine with other random code and make a new program. This is never told to us so it's just an idea.

      They do actually understand what they have. I think maybe you don't understand what they have. Sometimes you just have to put a little logic into these things and it's easier to understand dude. So go ahead and rage on here or some TRON fan sites, when you cool down you'll see you were probably wrong.

      • Troff says:

        > According to the Tron story line Tron 2.0 is just like the ton of fan fiction people make for a popular series.
        Which would be fine, except it was a Disney/Buena Vista production co-starring Boxleitner and Cindy Morgan with music by Wendy Carlos and designs by Syd Mead (lovely guy. Met him when he came out to Australia).

        > Betrayal is somewhat explained in Legacy
        Betrayal's end is contradicted by the flashbacks shown in Legacy.

        > Evolution is just a little more of Betrayal and just explain more of what caused the events in Legacy. They don't actually need to explain it to Flynn since
        The only reason Quorra survived the purge is because of Anon's work. And imagine how Disney could've gotten more people buying Evolution if Anon and the events of Evolution had been directly mentioned in Legacy. Worked for "The Matrix" and its spin-off games.

        > Also, if normal rules don't apply to The Grid then why are spontaneously-generated programs so bad?
        Because we're expected to believe it's a computer, but there's not one mechanism – or even a throwaway line of dialogue – to explain such a thing; not in the way computers work, not even set up in the special mythology of TRON. Not "corpses" of failed Programs, no explanation of maybe how Grid Bugs coalesce to form ISOs; just /ex nihilo/ creation of Programs.

        > Flynn may not have the same powers of his dad in The Grid since he is new there
        But Kevin Flynn did the "impossible" with a Solar Sailer beam in the original.

        > The new vehicles are just part of what happens when you try and make a prequel
        And don't care about maintaining continuity.

        > Since a User is in hiding the computer cannot crash.
        … have you ever USED a computer?

        > The computer could also just make new programs after things have been de-rezz.
        And if that were so, then CLU wouldn'tve needed the guards to have gone around kidnapping Programs for Rectification.

        > Sometimes you just have to put a little logic into these things and it's easier to understand dude
        … I'm just gonna sit here for a while until you think about what you just said.

        > So go ahead and rage on here or some TRON fan sites, when you cool down you'll see you were probably wrong.
        a) Saw the movie on the premiere night, a year and two months ago.
        b) Haven't heard you actually point out anything "wrong" yet. In fact, quite the reverse, I'm afraid.

    • SW1 says:

      I couldn't disagree more with this review. The supposed "inconsistencies" speak more to the reviewer's lack of imagination than to the film's writing. Only the light cycles couldn't go off road and clearly she had some way of covering her tracks. Once Clu knew where Flynn's place was he had no trouble getting there. As far as the early 2000s xbox game Tron 2.0: who cares? I wouldn't expect any Star Wars films to give a "nod" to Dark Forces or Tie Fighter the game…
      They clearly DID have computer scientists consulting them –and the spontaneous creation of code was one of the best things about the movie. It introduced something a lot of sifi is missing: a mystery. A mythology. Ever heard of "emergent behavior?" Google it. It's a phenomenon that happens even when the simplest rules are applied to a system. And I'd hardly call a despotically "optimized" system "lawless." Obviously, however the system is not connected to the internet as a whole and as such The Grid could most certainly be a "Frontier Town" (if you are willing to suspend your disbelief about any of it why not?)
      Clu was very aware of Flynn's powers –this was a system that was ready for a user to be in it. In the first movie Flynn's presence was an anomaly. By this time users entering the grid (at least Flinn and David?) had gone in on a regular basis for some time before the revolution. It's perfectly reasonable that Sam might not have the same advantages.
      The movie wasn't the particular nerd-gasm that some people might have wanted, but it was a well realized, well written and brilliantly executed vision none the less.

      • Troff says:

        > The supposed "inconsistencies" speak more to the reviewer's lack of imagination than to the film's writing.
        It's the audience's job to cover a writer's inconsistencies? Hollywood must LOVE you.

        > Only the light cycles couldn't go off road
        CLU and co.'s batons were the same which made the LightJets.

        > clearly she had some way of covering her tracks. Once Clu knew where Flynn's place was he had no trouble getting there
        Staying out of the way. Sam abandons the Cycle, Jarvis tracked it back to the mountains.

        > Once Clu knew where Flynn's place was he had no trouble getting there.
        And if the writing had been consistent and smarter, rather than Kitsis and Horowitz just wanting to design "new cool fly rides", Rinzler would've whipped out the LightJet to follow Quorra straight away… thereby ending the movie in under half an hour.

        > I wouldn't expect any Star Wars films to give a "nod" to Dark Forces or Tie Fighter the game
        "Dark Forces" introduced the character of Kyle Katarn; who is now a stealth pilot, Jedi Master and Jedi Council member in the series of post-movie novels that have been ongoing for about twenty years.

        I WOULD expect it.

        > They clearly DID have computer scientists consulting them
        Oh, really?

        They had SCIENTISTS from the Science And Entertainment Exchange as consultants, AFTER the script was in place. Go read blogs.discovermagazine.com/cosmicvariance/2010/12/20/science-of-tron/ – where one of the consulting scientists Sean Carroll says that the only part of the science they really discussed that made it into Legacy was Conservation of Mass and the tanks of raw chemical the laser uses to rebuild the User in the Real World.

        … which, by the way, would have made CLU's threat to invade the Real World with thousands of troops COMPLETELY UNWORKABLE.

        > It introduced something a lot of sifi is missing: a mystery. A mythology.
        … if you're prepared to spell it "sifi" and you really think that actual science fiction is missing mystery and mythology, then you've already surrendered all right to participate in this conversation.

        > Ever heard of "emergent behavior?" Google it. It's a phenomenon that happens even when the simplest rules are applied to a system.
        Step-by-step evolutionary simple behaviour, not complex beings /ex nihilo/. Go look at Conway's Game Of Life. That's emergent behaviour from automata. Now go compare that to an actual computer program, let alone a TRON Program.

        > however the system is not connected to the internet as a whole and as such The Grid could most certainly be a "Frontier Town"
        Not while remaining stable.

        > if you are willing to suspend your disbelief about any of it why not?
        Because at least some foundation and rules have been put into place that regulate the events which require suspension.

        > By this time users entering the grid (at least Flinn and David?)
        … are we talking about the same movie here?

        > but it was a well realized, well written and brilliantly executed vision none the less.
        And pretty much everything you've said proves that it wasn't.

    • Vulpis says:

      Hmmm. I partially agree with you, but do think you've missed a few things, especially on the presentation of the Grid. Legacy falls short of the original in a lot of ways, but it's not horrible, either.

      First off, keep in mind that the Grid is *not* the same machine as Encom's system from the first movie–from what I can tell, the Grid is an isolated machine run entirely by Flynn. Also..different style in how the programs themselves are represented as well–where the original Tron had regular program expressing their authors, Legacy seems more built around a 'cellular automata' concept, where Kevin's not so much writing the program, he's created the framework where the Grid's residents adapt, grow, and write *themselves* (see AI concepts, really, especially neural networks and learning programs)–with their programmer not always sure just where they're getting their concepts from (in both good and bad forms, considering that this is also the basis for Clu's behavior as well as the others).
      I semi agree with you on the bit about Kevin mostly lacking 'User Powers' (he does show them, but they're more of a low-level manipulation of thigns using his intimate knowledge of the Grid, rather than the larger-scale energy control of the original). And Sam probably *does* have them, but he doesn't really get the chance to learn about them–which is just as well since they're basically something of a deus ex machina in the first place. Plus, there's just plain different physics in the Grid–Sam bleeds, and Kevin has regular food and such, where in the original everything was about the flow of energy (in the novel, it's in fact hinted that the energy manipulation is actually a normal thing, it's just that Kevin is able to do it at immense scales, with amounts that would make a regular program blow out).

      Also something to think about–in Legacy, the original Tron is portrayed as 'Just a movie', which may or may not be accurate to the 'real event' Flynn went through–wonder if what *we* have as Tron is that same 'exaggerated by Hollywood' version. ;-)

      I do agree with you about not giving more of a nod to Tron 2.0, since Legacy seems to be its own separate timeline from 2.0. It's be nice to see some way to reconcile the two (though I think the way the digitizing technology exists in each version would be hard to bring together. Otherwise, 2.0 could be what's going on at Encom while Kevin is off doing his own thing–though I'd have a hard time thinking of reasons why Jet and Sam *wouldn't* know about each other.

    • JustObserving says:

      ^ Way too much time on his hands and taking himself WAY too seriously.

      • Troff says:

        a) Not enough time. I'm taking a break from doing housework and studying for a certification exam.

        b) Don't be silly. I'm not taking myself seriously at all. I'm taking Disney's multi-million dollar production, based on an old and well-loved franchise seriously.

        c) You're on a website/blog called "Hero Complex (for your inner fanboy)" and you're being nuts enough to criticise me for commenting?

        Breathe more deeply, son; the oxygenated red blood cells aren't getting where they need to go.

    • @KRMarlo says:

      Or it could just be a wickedly cool, hyper-visual film aimed at 10-year-old boys about a dude getting sucked into a "video game." You know…like that first one back in 1982.

      Ohhhhh, but that's right. The writing was GOLD on that one! I forgot about that!

      /eyeroll

      • Troff says:

        But the concept was groundbreaking, award-winning, industry-defining and a goldmine for Disney now. You forgot about that too.

        /headslap

      • @KRMarlo says:

        Nope…I didn't. I simply embrace that film, and Legacy for what they are, and love them both for it.

        I pick and choose what I care to (over)analyze, and for my money, that honor went (and continues to go) to Inception from 2010's geek film fare.

        Sometimes a ride is just a ride, and as articulate and intelligent as your thoughts are on the matter, it positively stinks of pompousness. To relegate those that enjoyed this work to a group that "loves to wallow in ignorance" is patently offensive and borders trolling.

        Art is subjective…period. You didn't like this film, many others did. Now we move on. All the dissection in the world isn't going to change what folks enjoy or don't enjoy.

        If we turned this kind of passion toward the lunacy of what our governments are doing instead of cinema's playground, we'd have colonized Mars already. Damn, dude.

  6. Richard says:

    when are companies gona just gona let go of the fact other countries exist and let us watch too. depressed canadian here…i love tron great story

  7. sirving says:

    and video block edin Canada.. gotta love that BS.

  8. memeplex says:

    Can't view that video in Baja California, it's blocked……LET THE INTERNET BE FREE!!!!

  9. TronnedOut says:

    Troff, you're obviously a computer nerd and not a filmmaker. I am both, and Tron Legacy lives up to the expectations to be called a sequel in so many levels and so many layers of subtext. Stop going through forums and live life a little bit to understand the purpose of movies versus what we expect. For example, an elevator isn't going to pop open instantly every time. Stop being selfish. Every movie will not meet every bullet point on your list. But a good movie will wake you up and say think a little bit outside your own perspective. Tron Legacy is what sequels are supposed to be: built on the foundation of the previous and but evolves the subtext (the f-ing point of the movie). Maybe avoid typing a page of nonsense found from googling and maybe go understand filmmaking. I could go on for pages about the excellent writing in Tron Legacy but whats the point… people who understand decent filmmaking already know…

  10. JA_sni says:

    I like to watch TRON, but why this not allowed to my country, Malaysia, bro?

  11. Darren Carter says:

    I had an idea for a Tron sequel that would have rocked.

    Here is the premise… the MCP was decompiled in the original movie. If you recall, the MCP was a massive program that had swallowed many other "conscripts" to become what it was. My idea is this: After the MCP was knocked off-line, ENCOM sells off various components of the MCP code to different corporations around the globe. 30 years later, all of these companies have gone online except one…and they go online. All of the original MCP code is now connected via the internet, forming an enormous Neural network and the MCP regains consciousness, once again going after world domination – this time with the power and resources of the world wide web. In order to save the world from total control of a self-aware terrorist Master Control program, ENCOM sends Flynn & Co into the Internet to take on the MCP on his turf.

    Sure it could use some polishing, but I think there is potential there…

  12. Stranton says:

    I think if they do make a third movie, it needs to be more on the Grid Games. I thought the second movie would be like that. Still…I'm a big fan of Tron and plan to be forever.

  13. Not A Program says:

    Hey Troff, it's a movie. Not real life. Just an FYI.

  14. Andrew says:

    As long as it has Daft Punk Still ill be happy!!!

  15. Fernando says:

    Cool! “The uploader has not made this video available in your country”. That’s why I hate Disney and their publishers.

  16. Hamezandcream says:

    I was disappointed for a few reasons some of which are covered above. I felt Tron Legacy was a step backwards from the Matrix films, which at least attempted some philosophy such as how dependent we are on machines/computers. Also, in the original Tron film the Master control program was in essence like a Frankenstein's monster in that it had been created but was taking control. This was tapping into a paranoia such as the Terminator franchise of the day when technology takes over from humans (and bad stuff happens). There was no real threat in Tron-Legacy as if those 'baddies' came into the real world, I don't think we'd be that scared, but if in like 'war games' they control Nukes, then we're in the shit.

  17. Atrus says:

    Children, children!

    If you didn’t like legacy and have already made up your minds about not liking the cartoon then why are you reading this. Like you momma said if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all. Some people liked legacy some didn’t and the animated series will be the same just like the star wars prequels, Indiana jones, and a hundred other remakes and spin-offs. If you don’t like it then don’t watch it, it doesn’t mean it’s BAD it just means its not for you!

  18. Troff says:

    To Not A Program:

    > Hey Troff, it's a movie. Not real life. Just an FYI.

    Oh, I know. But the original was a movie that got me started in my career and life-long interest; as it did to so many other people. I have a lot of love for it, that's all.

    ——-

    To Atrus:

    > If you didn't like legacy and have already made up your minds about not liking the cartoon then why are you reading this.

    Because it has great source material, such better potential; and we hope for more.

    ——-

    To TronnedOut:

    > Troff, you're obviously a computer nerd and not a filmmaker.

    Don't appreciate your terminology, but you're basically correct.

    > I am both, and Tron Legacy lives up to the expectations to be called a sequel in so many levels and so many layers of subtext.

    Please elucidate these levels and layers. There are many professional reviewers who quite openly claim that Legacy does not.

    > Stop going through forums and live life a little bit to understand the purpose of movies versus what we expect.

    "Going through forums"? Oh I'm so sorry, did my opinion offend you?

    And what, precisely, are you doing here then?

    People like you who keep accepting the pap that comes out of Hollywood are the reason they get away with continually producing such pap.

    > For example, an elevator isn't going to pop open instantly every time.

    Stop being so thoroughly silly. Not once did I say that the original TRON movie was technically accurate; however, its innovation and the inspiration it provided to an entire demographic, whether through technical achievement or even in concept of story, is still undeniable.

    > Stop being selfish.

    Damn you to hell sir, I will not. I reiterate: people like you who keep accepting the pap that comes out of Hollywood are the reason they get away with continually producing such pap. If Hollywood wants my money, it has to get that precisely by satisfying me.

    William H. Macy said "It seems to me that throughout the entire history of film-making, every year there have been about two really wonderful movies, about ten others that are pretty good, and a whole pile of garbage. That seems to be consistent year after year, if you ask me".

    If Hollywood wants more money, it should skew that Bell Curve towards the positive. But hey, if you're willing to give up your cash for substandard, below average, intellectually crippled mindless trash, that's your problem. However, you may NOT enforce your foolishness on others.

    The entire point of progress in human technology and society is to do what we do, then learn to make it a little better. You have no right whatsoever to tell me I can't expect a group with Hollywood's and Disney's resources to keep coasting and not put some better work into their product if they want my loyalty.

    And quite frankly, I fear for your nation if they're composed of people who're happy to let such quality slide.

    … continued in part 2. Longer comment spaces please, LA Times?

  19. Troff says:

    Part 2: to Tronned Out:

    > Every movie will not meet every bullet point on your list.
    Olivia Wilde's emotional expression as she discovers the Real World. Daft Punk's soundtrack. It would've been nice if it had met more than TWO.

    > But a good movie will wake you up and say think a little bit outside your own perspective.
    The original TRON succeeded.

    After being comfortable with works like Cory Doctorow's and Benjamin Rosenbaum's "True Names", or the workds of Greg Egan or Charles Stross, "TRON Legacy" failed to even turn the key in the door of "my own perspective".

    So even by your definition, "TRON Legacy" fails to be a "good movie".

    > Tron Legacy is what sequels are supposed to be:

    Under-thought, conceptually stolen-and-slapped together cash grabs without a single real attempt at understanding the deeper philosophy of the innovative and inspirational source material as a vehicle for merchandising to a public who've learned to accept the lowest common intellectual denominator?

    Are you American? Because frankly, you're ringing all the bells that non-Americans have been seeing come out of American culture. I'm pegging you as an O'Reilly fan rather than, say, a Stewart or Colbert watcher.

    > built on the foundation of the previous and but evolves the subtext (the f-ing point of the movie)

    What subtext? Precisely what evolution? By all means, earn my apology by pointing to some genuinely intelligent subtext!

    Director Kosinski has said explicitly; that he hadn't rewatched the original before making the new movie; more, that this became about "the human story", rather than everything that had made the original movie groundbreaking and unlike EVERY OTHER MOVIE IN THE WORLD that tries to be about "the human story". The whole point of any kind of science-fiction is to show how the new, the invented, the different will change us. Instead, Legacy just became another "oh boo-hoo, my dad's gone".

    And I find it more interesting that you haven't answered the other criticisms – that Kitsis and Horowitz failed to write consistently within the logic of their own SINGLE movie, let alone with the storylines that came out of the associated materials "Betrayal" and "Evolution"; that unlike original writer Bonnie Macbird, they didn't even bother trying to understand the computer industry before embarrassing themselves with the Boardroom scene.

    > Maybe avoid typing a page of nonsense found from googling and maybe go understand filmmaking.
    First you call me a "computer nerd", then you're simply assuming that I'm commenting on this topic by copying-and-pasting somebody else's text, rather than actually having an idea on the topic? Are you too fanboy angry-and-offended to think clearly or just too immature to seek quality?

    > I could go on for pages about the excellent writing in Tron Legacy but whats the point… people who understand decent filmmaking already know…
    Let's see what Roger Ebert had to say: `may not have legs, because its appeal is too one-dimensional for an audience much beyond immediate responders. When "2001" was in theaters, there were fans who got stoned and sneaked in during the intermission for the sound-and-light trip. I hesitate to suggest that for "Tron: Legacy," but the plot won't suffer'.

    Thank you; for demonstrating that you have absolutely no idea of what you're actually saying. I won't call you stupid, but you've certainly demonstrated that you enjoy wallowing in ignorance. You've provided no reason to believe that you're either computer nerd or film-maker instead of some thirteen-year-old.

    • Zenthing says:

      @ Troff

      Your feelings about how Tron is meant to be is clearly based on how the first movie inspired you to delve into the world of computers and how they changed your life. It's funny how an idea or concept that was once alien to us can drive us to become something different than what we are. The films or stories that shape us, grab us and stick with us form nothing short of a religion inside that if challenged, leads us to striking levels of defense, shielding those things we hold in our hearts.

      But like the world filled with ideals, beliefs and opinions, ours all differ. To me, the Tron: Legacy movie actually inspired me in the same way the original did you, as i have been an aspiring programmer. The arguments made questioning the realism of a computer system are very moot, considering the Deus Ex Machina of both films being a molecular deconstructor/reassembler laser should immediately prompt the sustaining of disbelief. I had seen the original when i was young and always liked it, but something about the newest version, beautifully orchestrated, strikingly artful, and acceptably written ( I'm not claiming it was Shakespeare, but seriously, the original was not either, I've seen it many times ), did that for me.

      So as I would say to any would be reviewer, keep in mind that your opinion is not fact, and that perhaps just because the emotions or general excitement the authors of any given story meant to impart upon you were lost, doesn't mean they didn't find their way into someone's heart.

  20. Long live Tron says:

    Wish there was a 2nd movie after Legacy. Regardless of torn now becoming a t.v show, you'll most likely be finding me infrint of a t.v. =P

  21. fred says:

    Troff = knob. It was a brilliant movie.

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