Comic-Con: David S. Goyer: It’s starting to feel like Sundance

July 25, 2009 | 4:12 p.m.

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From “Hero Complex” guest blogger David S. Goyer:

Nearing home from Comic-Con . . .

On the train ride back to Los Angeles, I sat with Joseph Fiennes and
Courtney Vance, who are two of the actors on “FlashForward” [the coming
ABC series executive-produced by Goyer]. 

Both were bowled over by their first Comic-Con experience. And both
appreciated the live interaction with the fans, which they’ve never
really participated in. 

Courtney managed to lose his wallet in the process, though, but my
intrepid associate, Izzy, found it and raced it to the train station in
the nick of time.

It’s been a long day for all. At one point, when we were on the main floor, Christine Woods (who 
plays
Janis on the show) turned to me with glazed eyes and said, “Yeah, I
think I’m done now.” She kind of had that thousand-yard stare on her
face.

Most embarrassing moment of the day? 

During the signing, a couple of autograph hounds asked me what part
I play on “FlashForward.” I said “Stanley Tucci” (whom I am sometimes
mistaken for).

The one thing I’ve seen over the years at Comic-Con — and find
disheartening — is the increase of parties by studios and others. It’s
becoming like Sundance. Everyone is vying to get into one party or
another, which leaves virtually less room for comic creators.

Anyway, always an insane, inspiring experience.  There’s nowhere
else on Earth where creators can interact with their audiences in such
amad, flash-mob kind of way. Humbling and a much-needed reminder of  why we do this.

Some other tidbits I’ll remember:

My assistant Nellie got “manhandled” by “someone in a really bad Joker costume.”

* * *

In
the greenroom before our “FlashForward” panel, there were spreads put
out by the various studios sharing the same space. There was ABC food
on one side, Warner Bros. food on the other. 

I rationalized that since I’d worked on the Batman films, that entitled me to graze at the Warner buffet 
table
instead. But apparently security didn’t buy my argument and rebuffed
me. So I sulked in the corner with a can of Red Bull and a bag of
kettle chips.

Then I saw Hurley and nerd-gasmed.

* * *

Behind the stage during our panel, Dominic Monaghan wore a Godzilla mask so no one would 
recognize him.  It worked: He blended in unnoticed.

– David S. Goyer

Photo: A screen shot of jointhemosaic.com, a “FlashForward”-related website. Credit: Courtesy of David S. Goyer

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Comments


2 Responses to Comic-Con: David S. Goyer: It’s starting to feel like Sundance

  1. chrissypoo says:

    “The one thing I’ve seen over the years at Comic-Con — and find disheartening — is the increase of parties by studios and others. It’s becoming like Sundance. Everyone is vying to get into one party or another, which leaves virtually less room for comic creators. ”
    Sour Grapes, David? Did you not get into the party you wanted to so you decided to “dis” all the parties?
    You are right; Comic-Con is becoming the Sundance of the summer. To those who feel that this is bad and somehow Hollywood’s fault need to only look at the attendance figures before San Diego Comic-Con became the destination for celebrities to promote their upcoming summer blockbuster or television show.
    Like Sundance, the only people that you can blame are SDCC leaders. Comic-Con created this monster. They are the ones who want it both ways. I’ve seen article after article how the leaders of CCI, the umbrella organization that runs San Diego’s Comic-Con, bemoan how Comic-Con has become the convention to see celebrities. They pine for the day when it becomes yet again a convention about just comics. In these interviews, they would love to move it all to a ballroom at the Marriott and have it become about comics again.
    Don’t be fooled, this is all for show to the comic community. It gives them street cred to act like they are still about comics. Any celebrity publicist who has had a celebrity down in San Diego know that these same CCI executives who dis the world of celebrity, are the same ones who are fawning over their clients.
    Like Sundance which seems to now only program pseudo indie movies with huge movie stars and big time directors (many times financed by big-time studios), Comic-Con books panel after panel filled with celebrity heavy pop culture movies and television. CCI knows that if they stopped this, their attendance would drop more than 60%.
    I feel, however, that Comic-Con becoming more like Sundance is a good thing.
    Because of parties like The Wrath of Con, EW/Syfy and others, celebrities are staying longer in San Diego than just the day of their panel discussion. This allows for those fans attending CCI to have more potential interaction with them.
    For the film and television industry, development executives & talent representatives spend more time trying to find that obscure comic or graphic novel to make into the next blockbuster because they are all staying multiple nights so they can attend these night time parties.

  2. David –
    I am SO psyched about Flash Forward – you have no idea (I don't think). TOTALLY my kind of show (my own books are time travel. . . in the other direction. Yup, I'm a nerdy history teacher !). I'm off next fall bc of writing demands, so will be able to justify staying up to watch tv ;)
    Great, great work – good luck, have fun, stay healthy. You're amazing.
    – Suzanne Segalini Litrel

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